Measles Tops 25-Year High Within First 4 Months of 2019 Alone, Adults May Need Booster Vaccine

The all-time record for the number of reported measles cases in the United States has reached a 25-year high, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced that there have been 704 cases reported nationally in just the first four months of 2019.

Authorities say some adults need a measles booster shot

As the number of measles cases in the US and around the globe continues to rise, the CDC is recommending that adults, who were vaccinated prior to 1968, “be revaccinated” with at least one dose of live attenuated measles vaccine.

The recommended vaccine is the MMR vaccine (measles, mumps and rubella). CDC says that individuals who received the vaccine between the years of “1963-1967… received a dose that was not effective.”

Getting the measles as an adult is more dangerous

Health officials are warning people to be aware not contracting the measles as an adult is more likely to cause complications from the illness, including pneumonia and brain swelling.

1.3% rise in measles cases less than a week

The total tally of measles cases has risen 1.3 percent in less than a week with 78 new cases, after the CDC reported a total of 695 cases only last Wednesday.

Measles cases have been reported in at least 22 states so far. New York City and Los Angeles have been the site of the two most recent large outbreaks prompting health emergencies there.

Vaccination myths contrary to scientific evidence

Officials say the largest contributing cause to the outbreak of measles cases is due to the disease spreading quickly among unvaccinated children.

This is largely blamed on parents who believe vaccination myths, that the vaccines cause autism and other disorders, contrary to scientific evidence. Thus, such parents have been opposed to having their children vaccinated.