New Terrifying US ‘Flying Ginsu’ Missile with Deadly Blades Revealed

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A frightening and formally secretive US missile has been unveiled which sprouts six long chopping blades, designed to take out terrorists in precision strikes while not causing harm to civilians.

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The Flying Ginsu or Ninja Bomb

The United States’ new weapon in the war on terror is a drone-deployed missile called the R9X, also known by two nicknames, the “Flying Ginsu,” and the “Ninja Bomb.” The name comes in comparison to the famous razor-sharp Ginsu knives used by chefs, and the Japanese knife-maker referred to ninjas in its marketing.

The moniker is based on the fact that the weapon sprouts six blades which expand outward just before impact. These blades slice and dice everything around them, including metal.

The new US missile has no explosive warhead. Instead, the ninja-like weapon works by extending six large blades, literal “swords,” that slice their way through the roofs of buildings and cars, shredding steel like paper, and everything in their path.

Allegedly, it is a modified version of the Hellfire missile (albeit without the explosives), weighing approximately 100 pounds.

Secret weapon developed under Obama administration

The new weapon was secretly developed beginning in early 2011 by order of President Barack Obama to avoid unnecessary civilian casualties.

The weapon is part of both the CIA’s and the Department of Defense’s (DoD) drone programs.

The weapon was developed “for the express purpose of reducing civilian casualties,” a CIA official said, finally admitting to the existence of the missile to the Wall Street Journal.

Has already been in use for years

According to the DOD, the agency has used the RX9 approximately six times, striking targets in Libya, Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Somalia.

The Wall Street Journal was only able to confirm that use of the missile by the CIA on two occasions, once in Yemen and wants and Syria.

It is known that the weapon was used in 2017, but may have been deployed as early as 2011.